FAQ

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Drones

eBee

eBee

  • What is included with the eBee?

    The standard eBee package contains the following items:

    • eBee foam body (inc. all electronics & built-in autopilot)
    • Pair of detachable wings
    • WX still camera (inc. 16 GB SD card, battery, USB cable & charger)
    • 2.4 GHz USB radio modem for data link (inc. USB cable)
    • Two Lithium-Polymer battery packs & charger
    • Spare propeller
    • Carry case with foam protection
    • Remote control & accessories (for safety pilots)
    • User manual
    • Software (supplied): eMotion (flight planning & control)
    • Software (optional): Pix4Dmapper (professional photogrammetry)
  • What is the eBee's default camera?

    The camera supplied with the eBee is an 18.2 megapixel WX RGB model. This suits most types of surveying and GIS/mapping applications.

  • What materials is the eBee made from?

    The eBee, eBee RTK and eBee Ag are made predominantly from lightweight and highly shock-absorbent expanded polypropylene (EPP) foam. Each of these aircraft also include a carbon structure and composite parts.

  • How easily can an eBee drone be repaired?

    In most cases very easily. Small cracks in the EPP foam airframe for example can be quickly and easily repaired using foam-compatible contact glue such as UHU® / POR® (note: a tube of EPP-friendly glue is provided in the box of every senseFly drone).

    The eBee’s wings can be easily replaced due to the drone’s modular design. 

    In case of serious damage to the airframe, the drone’s built-in electronics still usually survive any collision because these are located in the upper half of the airframe and surrounded by shock absorbent foam.

    Your local distributor or senseFly’s direct sales team can provide you with a quote for airframe replacement.

  • Is it possible to increase the range/endurance of the eBee?

    The battery used by senseFly's eBee drones has been carefully selected for optimal endurance given the drone’s available payload capacity. It is therefore not possible to artificially increase the endurance or the range of these systems.

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albris

albris

  • Which senseFly drone should I buy?

    This depends on its likely usage and the kind of data outputs you are looking to produce. Generally speaking, for larger scale mapping projects, an eBee drone is perfect. For smaller mapping projects and up-close inspection work, albris is the best choice.

    For a detailed comparison of senseFly drones, see this drone comparison page.

    Also see the following post on our Waypoint blog: Should You Buy a Fixed Wing or Rotary Drone?

  • What is included with the albris?

    The standard albris package contains the following items:

    • albris drone
    • Interactive ScreenFly controller
    • 2.4 GHz remote control (for safety pilots)
    • 2.4 GHz/5GHz dual band USB radio modem
    • Two SD memory cards (32 GB)
    • Two batteries
    • Two single battery chargers w/power supplies
    • Wheeled carry case
    • User Manual
    • USB cable set
    • Spare leg set
    • Spare propeller set
    • Software (supplied): eMotion X (flight planning & control) 
    • Software (optional): Pix4Dmapper (professional photogrammetry)
  • What are all the sensors in the payload/TripleView head?

    The albris’s TripleView sensor head is a fully stabilised unit that provides three distinct types of imagery: HD video, thermal video/stills, and ultra high-resolution still images.

    This head unit also contains the aircraft’s front-positioned ultrasonic and vision sensors, which provide the operator with advanced situational awareness.

  • Can albris' cameras (thermal, high res stills & video) all record data at the same time?

    The albris is currently programmed to record one type of imagery at a time. However the user can easily switch between the drone’s cameras—during flight—via the albris’ eMotion X ground station software. 

  • How do I transfer the photos my drone acquires to my computer?

    These still images are stored on the drone's onboard SD memory card. After landing, simply connect your Windows PC or tablet to your camera via USB cable (recommended) or remove this memory card and insert it into your PC or tablet directly. The drone's photos are then copied via eMotion's Flight Data Manager importation process.

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Software

eMotion

eMotion

Cameras & Accessories

eBee

eBee

  • Which camera option should I choose?

    This depends on the type of data you are looking to collect and analyse.

    The S110 RGB and the eBee's default WX camera, just like standard consumer cameras, acquire red, green and blue band data. This type of imagery suits most most surveying, cartographic, GIS and mining applications.

    As for the S110 NIR (the eBee Ag's default camera), this camera's bands have been shifted into the red (570 - 690 nm), green (510 - 660 nm) and NIR (780 - 1000 nm) bands, enabling this sensor to capture the amount of near-infrared radiation a surface such as soil or a leaf reflects; useful for calculating indices such as the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI).

    The S110 RE meanwhile captures blue, green and red-edge band data, the latter corresponding to wavelengths of 670 - 760 nm. With this camera, other types of agricultural analysis can be conducted such as monitoring plant stress and senescence analysis.

    The individual bands in cameras like the S110 RGB, RE or NIR overlap to produce a more balanced image, but each overlapping channel can cause small amounts of noise in other bands. As a result, this noise can lead to an imperfect readout. That’s where our fourth camera option, the high-end multiSPEC 4C, comes in. With this camera, each band corresponds to an enclosed part of the spectrum, meaning there is no band overlap at all, providing ultra-precise four band accuracy.

    Our latest fixed-wing camera option meanwhile is the thermoMAP. This thermal sensor enables eBee, eBee Ag and eBee RTk drones to capture thermal video and still images. This in turn enables operators to create thermal maps of a site (for example, to map water distribution, check irrigation systems or assess the functionality of solar panels). 

    Explore our different camera options.

  • Which bands does the multiSPEC 4C offer?

    The multiSPEC 4C uses four separate 1.2 MP sensors to provide image data across four highly precise bands: green, red, red-edge and near infrared (NIR).

    Learn more.

  • How is infrared data, like that provided by the eBee Ag’s NIR camera, different from thermal information?

    Infrared imaging refers to any kind of imaging system that operates in the infrared spectral range – spanning wavelengths of roughly .7 to 300 microns. However near infrared (NIR) imaging is concerned with a different portion of this spectral range than thermal imaging.

    Near infrared (NIR) - also sometimes called "photographic infrared" - is reflected energy (e.g. in the case of agriculture, we focus on the energy reflected off the leaves of plants and soil – this reflectance data in turn can be used to create vegetation indices, analyse plant stress etc.). With wavelengths of .8 to 1.5 microns, NIR is too high frequency to catch thermal emissions.

    Thermal infrared, by contrast, is emitted energy and features wavelengths roughly ten times longer than those of NIR (averaging around 10 microns). This is the portion of infrared range that is emitted by an object at, or just above, what we know as room temperature. At such wavelengths you can see images that people typically associate with so-called ‘thermal vision’. In other words, living creatures will appear brighter than other objects, engines will stand out and so on.

    Spectral_frequency_graphic.jpg

Operations

eBee

eBee

  • How is such a light aircraft stable enough to take high-resolution images?

    At senseFly we occasionally hear this question after people learn just how light senseFly drones are (for example, the eBee weighs approximately 700 g or 1.5 lb!).

    Each time a senseFly drone takes a photo the drone stabilises itself and cuts its motor, so that no vibration occurs that might compromise its images.

    The engine of a senseFly drone is surprisingly powerful, configured not just to reach the highest cruising speed possible but also to retain some power in order to compensate for different wind effects that the drone senses via its pitot tube.

    However, if the drone is unable to take a particular photo — because of a strong gust of wind affecting its orientation for example — its eMotion flight software will notify you of this. In any case, one or two missed images, from what is usually a hundred or more, will not cause a project to fail.

  • How does an eBee drone take off?

    Thanks to eBee drones being very lightweight, these can be hand launched (see this eBee flight video). This also means that no additional accessories, such as bungees or ramps catapults, are required.

    We recommend always launching your eBee against the wind (in order to limit its required ground velocity). The drone’s original take-off location is automatically selected by eMotion as its emergency landing spot (i.e. Home waypoint). This point should therefore be clear of obstacles within a 40-metre radius.

  • How does an eBee land and how much space does this require?

    eBee drones can be programmed, in eMotion, to land in one of two ways: a linear landing (the default) or a circular landing.

    When planning a linear landing flight in eMotion, an operator sets the landing zone (Home waypoint) and one or more approach sectors (trajectories). The eBee will then choose its preferred landing trajectory based on the wind conditions, the aim being to land into the wind.

    Whichever landing type is chosen, when the eBee’s ground sensor detects the ground 5 metres (16.4 ft) below the aircraft, the drone’s motor is reversed, causing the drone to slow (effectively an ‘air brake’) and float gently to the ground. This manoeuvre is made possible by the eBee’s very light weight and carefully optimised flight speed. This approach enables eBees to boast linear landing accuracies of +/- 5 m (16 ft).

    Circular landings meanwhile suit environments where linear approach sectors might not be viable.

    In terms of the space required for eBee landings:

    • For linear landings, an obstacle free zone of 10 m (32.8 ft) radius around the Home waypoint is required.
    • For a circular landing, this is usually possible within a radius of 30 metres. However, to be on the safe side - in case of strong winds etc. - we recommend you choose a landing zone that is free of obstacles within a radius of 50 metres.
  • What are the surface requirements for the landing zone?

    Grassy areas are ideal, however asphalt or other hard surfaces are also feasible.

    In general, senseFly fixed wing drones are so lightweight and have such low kinetic energy - less than a kicked football - that they will not be irreparably destroyed due to landing on a hard surface.

    Of course your landing zone should be free of prominent obstacles such as large rocks, posts, trees, buildings, cars etc. (Should a car come to stop in the landing zone during your flight, you can simply move the Home waypoint during the flight via eMotion.)

  • Can the eBee fly in all weather conditions?

    eBee drones can fly in winds of up to 45 km/h (12 m/s or 28 mph). In other words, strong breezes.

    They can also fly in low-visibility conditions, even at night.

    Although light rain will usually not affect an eBee’s flight characteristics, the eBee is not fully waterproof and should therefore not be used when it is raining or snowing.

    For the best possible image quality, the eBee should be used on clear days with only light wind (up to 8 m/s - i.e. a normal breeze - is fine).

    eBee operators around the world have flown successfully, many times, in very cold and very hot conditions - eBees have been employed in locations as far flung as the Antarctic and the scorching Australian Outback. Read about their varied usage on our Case Studies page.

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  • What is the operating temperature range of eBee drones?

    The eBee has been tested in temperatures ranging from -15 °C (5 °F) to +35 °C (95 °F) and its electronics are designed to work in temperatures ranging from -20 °C (-4 °F) to 50 °C (122 °F).

    Note however that the battery’s performance can decrease at lower temperatures, leading to an endurance reduction of up to 20%.

  • At what altitudes can eBees fly?

    The eBee has been tested for take-off at up to 4,000 m (13,123 ft) above sea level and in flight at up to 5,200 m (17,060 ft) above sea level.

    Technically speaking, there is virtually no limit to the altitude the eBee can fly at. However what is important to remember is that this altitude is a result of the ground resolution required by the operator; when this resolution is set in the drone’s eMotion flight planning software, the program automatically determines and sets the optimal flight altitude.

    For example, a desired ground resolution of 3 cm (1.2 in) per pixel will lead to eMotion setting the drone’s flight altitude at 100 m (328 ft). If such a high resolution is not required, for example if maximising the drone’s coverage area is more important, then choosing 30 cm or 12 inches per pixel would increase eMotion’s chosen flight altitude to 1000 m (3,281 ft).

    Every operator must of course ensure that the altitude set by eMotion abides by their country’s federal aviation regulations.

  • How many images can be taken during one flight?

    When photos are triggered at the maximum rate (every 3.8 seconds), the number of images in one flight can reach up to 700. The SD memory card provided with senseFly drones has more than enough space to store such a number of images at full resolution.

  • What happens if the eBee RTK's radio lock is lost during flight?

    Firstly, if the eBee RTK is used as recommended (up to 3 km), its radio link is rarely compromised.

    If the radio link is lost for any reason however, photos are then taken in ‘standalone’ mode (rather than the more accurate ‘RTK fix’ mode). Since these images are less accurate, their positions are given lower priority by the drone’s optional Pix4Dmapper Pro software.

    The position of the resulting orthomosaic is then calculated based largely on those images acquired while flying in ‘RTK fix’ mode (i.e. those photos taken when the radio link was still active).

  • How do I find my drone if it flies out of radio range or crashes?

    The standard range of an eBee drone's radio link is approximately 3 km (1.86 miles).

    In the vast majority of cases, a senseFly drone flying out of radio range poses no problem. It certainly does not usually lead to a crash. Since the drone is designed to fly autonomously it features numerous failsafe systems. These return it to its Home waypoint if trouble occurs (where it will either commence landing or allow you to give new commands), such as the battery running low, high winds, or the drone reaching the edge of eMotion’s working area radius.

    IF a drone crashes within radio range, this can be located in either of two ways: its last GPS coordinates will be displayed in eMotion, so you can simply input these into your smartphone’s map application to find the drone; or the aircraft’s last position can be visually identified on the base map being shown in eMotion.

    For operators planning to fly eBee drones in extreme situations, such as those with potentially high gusty winds, very mountainous areas, out of line of sight, or over very large coverage areas, we offer an optional radio tracker system. This comprises a small radio tracker that fits snugly in the compartment next to the eBee’s battery space, plus a handheld receiver. Contact your local senseFly distributor to order this tracker.

  • How can I ensure mapping success and reduce risk in mountainous areas?

    Our eMotion flight planning software is able to take into account elevation data to set the altitude of mission waypoints and the resulting flight lines of a mapping mission. This not only improves the resulting ground resolution but also increases mission safety by keeping a more even height between the eBee and the ground underneath it.

    To display elevation data you simply click on the relevant button in eMotion’s Toolbar when flight planning (an internet connection is required). eMotion’s default Improved SRTM elevation data will be downloaded as tiles from senseFly servers and overlaid above the map as a colourmap. You can then adjust the scale and opacity of this colourmap.

  • How long does it take to swap and recharge batteries between flights?

    Changing a senseFly drone’s battery takes almost no time (provided of course that a second, fully-charged battery is available).

    Recharging a depleted eBee battery takes around an hour using the charger provided. For albris this time is up to 1.5 hours.

    Additional batteries are available to order from your local senseFly representative.

  • How does flight planning work?

    Flight planning is handled by our eMotion ground station software, a version of which is supplied for free with every senseFly drone. 

    This software program connects your Windows laptop or tablet with your senseFly drone via a USB radio modem, which is also supplied.

     

  • What happens if an eBee drone's battery runs low or wind levels increase?

    senseFly drones continually monitor a range of parameters, including the battery’s charge, atmospheric wind conditions and many more. A warning is activated, shown in eMotion, should any parameter move into dangerous territory, at which point the drone automatically returns and lands.

  • What happens if the drone's GPS signal is lost?

    This occurs only extremely rarely since GPS signal reception is usually extremely strong during flight (due to the absence of any obstacles). However, if the signal should be lost for any reason, normal waypoint-based navigation obviously becomes no longer possible. Therefore in order to minimise the risk of damage and threat to third parties, the drone will land immediately in a circular (rather than linear) pattern, at slow speed.

  • How much training is required to operate an eBee drone?

    Training on senseFly fixed-wing drones usually takes between two and five hours. In theory, it is sufficient merely to read the drone’s user manual in order to get started. However all our distributors typically offer face-to-face training sessions to help you get started using your senseFly UAV.

  • How does the flight planning process work?

    Flight planning is handled by our eMotion ground station software, which is supplied for free with every senseFly drone. This software package connects your Windows laptop/tablet with your senseFly drone via a USB radio modem, which is also supplied. This eMotion video explains the flight planning process in more detail.

  • What happens if the radio lock is lost during flight?

    Firstly, if a senseFly drone is used as recommended (up to 3 km, or 1.9 miles, for the eBee), its radio link is rarely compromised.

    However if the radio signal is lost, the eBee will return to its Home waypoint (as set in eMotion during flight planning) at an altitude defined by the Home waypoint’s Change Altitude Parameter (this is set to Highest by default).

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albris

albris

  • How long does it take to swap and recharge batteries between flights?

    Changing a senseFly drone’s battery takes almost no time (provided of course that a second, fully-charged battery is available).

    Recharging a depleted eBee battery takes around an hour using the charger provided. For albris this time is up to 1.5 hours.

    Additional batteries are available to order from your local senseFly representative.

  • How does the albris’ autonomous mapping mode work?

    This flight mode is based on GPS waypoint navigation. You define what you want to map (using eMotion X software), then albrisautomatically creates its waypoint-based flight plan, takes off, flies, captures imagery, and lands itself.

    From Autonomous mode, you can also switch into Interactive ScreenFly mode at any time, before before resuming your Autonomous flight.

  • How does the albris’ live streaming/interactive mode work?

    We call this mode Interactive ScreenFly. In this mode you do not pilot the drone using a standard remote control. Instead you view the albris’s live video feed via a Windows laptop or tablet, and use the supplied ScreenFly controller to move the drone and orientate its TripleView sensor. No advanced piloting skills required!

    This mode includes several intelligent assistance features such as Distance Lock, Cruise Control and Auto-Trigger.

  • Can the albris be remotely piloted?

    Yes it can be remotely piloted. It is supplied with a RC for manual use (this employs a second, independent radio link that takes full control of the aircraft). This RC control is not assisted however and does not stabilise the albris’s momentum, therefore it should only be used by skilled RC pilots.

  • How long does it take to learn to fly albris?

    Is it difficult to give a single concrete answer, since this depends how deeply an operator wants to use albris's different functionalities and how much of an expert he or she wants to become in using albris's different flight modes.

    Most users find the albris's Interactive ScreenFly mode very easy to use and are able to fly the aircraft pretty much straight away in this mode. Equally, for GPS waypoint-based autonomous mapping flights, the popularity of our existing fixed-wing eBee systems is, in part, due to the simplicity of their operation.

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  • Is albris rainproof?

    No. Like most multi-rotor systems, albris should not be flown in the rain.

  • Can I use the albris to inspect power lines?

    Yes, this is one of the core applications that albris was designed for.

    Our test projects have confirmed that albris can be used very effectively for such projects, both for the collection of high-resolution inspection images and the reconstruction of 3D models of transmission towers.

    Visit our Example Datasets page to explore a transmission tower inspection data set.n the rain.

  • Can I use the albris to inspect cooling towers?

    Yes, this is one of albris’ target applications.

    Note: we recommend, during such work, to approach such towers progressively, little by little, in order to ensure you remain fully aware of any changing wind conditions close to the surfaces of such structures.

  • Can the albris be used to inspect rough or uneven surfaces?

    Yes, you can use the drone's Interactive ScreenFly mode to follow such surfaces manually.

     

  • Can albris map/model a building, tower or chimney stack automatically?

    Yes. This is simple by flying an autonomous mapping flight and planning this use an Around Point Of Interest mission block.

    If required, additional images and/or video can then be captured by switching into Interactive ScreenFly mode mid-flight.

  • Will the albris’ software enable me to undertake fully automated surveys of electrical pylons that include both photographic and thermal data?

    Due to their complexity, electrical pylons / transmission towers are best flown using a combination of autonomous mapping (specifically using eMotion X's Around Point of Interest mission block) and Interactive ScreenFly mode. 

    Just as our eBee drone’s eMotion software has evolved over the years to fit operators' evolving requirements, so eMotion X will continue to evolve — and always with future new releases of this software available to albris users at no extra cost.

    As such, we will continue to listen to customer feedback and requests, adding new mission blocks as required.

  • Can albris fly inside a building or in areas without GPS coverage?

    Yes, this is possible by flying an Interactive ScreenFly or manual flight, with No GNSS mode activated.

  • What is the albris’ maximum flight altitude?

    In terms of the albris’ achievable maximum operational altitude above mean sea level (AMSL), the albris has been tested to date at up to 3,883 metres (12,739 feet) AMSL. (Note: At high altitude albris’ performance is reduced, also partly due to the temperature and wind conditions.)

    In terms of altitude above the take-off point, the altitude at which albris flies is a result of the image resolution the operator requires, since this defines the altitude that eMotion X sets for an Autonomous flight.

    Therefore a more relevant question is actually: what resolution do you require? (Plus of course: up to what altitude are you legally permitted to fly at?)

    albris projects typically involve flying between a few meters and 300 m (1,000 ft) above the ground.

  • What happens if the albris is blown out of position/off course while in flight or while hovering?

    The drone’s built-in autopilot will move it back into position.

  • What will the albris do if it cannot reach a waypoint due to an unexpected obstacle?

    albris’ waypoint-based autonomous flights are based on the user’s accurate flight planning and additional monitoring during flight—therefore the assumption is made that there are no obstacles blocking albris’s path.

    However if an operator notices an object in the albris’ flight path, he/she has a range of emergency manoeuvres easily available, all accessible via eMotion X. The first action we recommend is to push the Hold button or to take over interactive control using the ScreenFly controller. In addition, if albris detects the proximity of the ground, it can automatically trigger a Hold action, regain altitude, and warn the user via eMotion X.

  • What are the surface requirements for the landing site?

    The albris should always take off and land on a stable, level surface. 

    You should not attempt to land the drone on steep slopes or areas covered with large rocks, debris, or featuring holes. Equally, the drone should not be landed on a wet surface, soft sand, thick snow, dust or mud.

  • How much training is required to operate an albris drone?

    Training on the albris usually takes between five and seven hours, although operators with experience of using senseFly’s eMotion ground station software and/rotary drones may require a little less.

    senseFly distributors typically offer this training face-to-face. You can locate your nearest senseFly distributor here.

  • How does flight planning work?

    Flight planning is handled by our eMotion ground station software, a version of which is supplied for free with every senseFly drone. 

    This software program connects your Windows laptop or tablet with your senseFly drone via a USB radio modem, which is also supplied.

     

  • How does the flight planning process work?

    Flight planning is handled by our eMotion ground station software, which is supplied for free with every senseFly drone. This software package connects your Windows laptop/tablet with your senseFly drone via a USB radio modem, which is also supplied. This eMotion video explains the flight planning process in more detail.

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Aerial Imagery

eBee

eBee

  • What is the area that can be typically imaged during one flight?

    The answer primarily depends on the ground resolution required, set in eMotion, and thus the flight altitude). Plus, the camera used also has an effect. Below are two example tables, based on usage of the eBee's supplied WX camera and, below that, its optional S110 RGB camera:

    Ground resolution (cm/px)351030
    Camera modelWX RGBWX RGBWX RGBWX RGB
    Mean flight line altitude (m/ATO)1072083541,074
    Lateral overlap (%)60606060
    Single image coverage (m x m)147 x 108245 x 180490 x 3611,469 x 1,083
    Total ground coverage (km2)1.11.761.966.5
    Ground resolution (cm/px)351030
    Camera modelS110 RGBS110 RGBS110 RGBS110 RGB
    Mean flight line altitude (m/ATO)104162302872
    Lateral overlap (%)60606060
    Single image coverage (m x m)120 x 90200 x 150400 x 3001,200 x 900
    Total ground coverage (km2)0.91.562.75.97
  • How do I process the drone's images after a flight?

    You need to own a professional photogrammetry software program, such as Pix4Dmapper (optional with every senseFly drone).

    The first step is then to import images and flight data onto your computer using eMotion's Flight Data Manager. This will also geotag your drone's images. 

    These images must then be imported into your photogrammetry software - this is handled by the Flight Data Manager too in the case of Pix4Dmapper - where they can be processed to generate a high-resolution orthomosaic, digital surface model, 3D point cloud and more.

  • Can I add ground control points (GCPs) to improve my project's absolute accuracy?

    Yes, the coordinates of GCPs can be introduced into professional photogrammetry software such as Pix4Dmapper (optional with every senseFly drone). It is then possible to achieve absolute accuracy of down to 0.3 mm (0.011 in) / pixel.

    Read the albris accuracy whitepaper.

  • What kind of positional accuracy can I expect?

    The accuracy of the orthomosaics and the digital surface models (DSMs) produced by professional photogrammetry software such as Pix4Dmapper (optional with every senseFly drone) depends on various factors, including: flight height, light conditions, availability of textures, image quality, overlap, and the type of terrain being mapped.

    In standard conditions, flying an eBee or eBee Ag at an altitude of 100-150 metres (328 - 492 ft) above natural terrain, with an image overlap of between 50% and 70%, and not using any ground control points (GCPs), a relative accuracy of 10 cm (3.9 in) and an absolute accuracy of 1 - 5 m (3.3 - 16.4 ft) can be expected at the location of the found matching points, when using Pix4Dmapper. Between these matching points the accuracy may vary. 

    These figures are vastly improved by using GCPs, with absolute accuracy then possible of down to 3 cm (1.2 in) / 5 cm (2 in).

    As for the eBee RTK, this survey-grade mapping drone is capable of achieving the same absolute accuracy - of down to 3 cm (1.2 in) / 5 cm (2 in) - without the need for GCPs.

    Read the eBee RTK Accuracy Assessment whitepaper

    (Please note that senseFly cannot guarantee in any way the quality and accuracy of your output files.)

  • How do I determine where my drone will take photos?

    Once you have set the area you want to map by highlighting a rectangle or polygon on a basemap in our eMotion flight planning software, this program will automatically create a flight plan based on your desired ground resolution, image overlap etc.

    The images your drone acquires will then be triggered automatically by the onboard autopilot at the correct position. However if this automated approach is not what you need, there are alternative approaches:

    - To take pictures on demand, you can use eMotion’s Take Photo Now button.

    - Or specific photo locations can be placed on the map. These will trigger the camera whenever the drone reaches these locations. This is a useful approach for photographing specific ground targets.

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  • What kinds of artefacts can I expect to see?

    In general, the orthomosaics produced with photogrammetry software such as Pix4Dmapper (an option with every senseFly drone) look very smooth. However there may be some ghosting effects if the drone captured images of objects that were moving on the ground.

    There may also be distortions at specific areas of an image. These are due to inaccuracies between matching points in the digital elevation model (DEM) reconstruction. This typically happens at the edges of buildings or in areas covered by insufficient number of images.

    Pix4Dmapper includes a tool that uses linear projection to avoid distorting objects if the DEM contains inaccuracies (typically over forested areas, the edges of buildings etc.).

  • Can I add ground control points (GCPs) to improve my project's absolute accuracy?

    Yes, the coordinates of GCPs can be introduced into professional photogrammetry software such as Pix4Dmapper (optional with every senseFly drone). This reduces the absolute error to the level of just a few centimetres/inches. 

    However, GCPs are no longer required to achieve absolute of down to 3 cm (1.2 in) / 5 cm (2 in) with the eBee RTK, since this survey-grade mapping drone can receive correction data from most leading brands of base station.

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albris

albris

  • What kind of area can I cover with a single albris flight?

    The albris’ single flight coverage is determined largely by the ground resolution the operator requires—the higher the-resolution, the lower the altitude and therefore the lower the coverage.

    For example, a single horizontal mapping flight with a ground resolution of 3 cm (1.2 in) /pixel will create a processed dataset with a total surface coverage of up to 30 hectares (74 acres).

    In contrast, a single 1 cm/pixel flight would equate to a processed surface of up to 10 hectares (24.7 acres).

  • How do I process the images after a flight?

    You need to own a professional photogrammetry software program, such as Pix4Dmapper (optional with every senseFly drone).

    The first step is then to import images and flight data onto your computer using eMotion X's Flight Data Manager. This will also geotag your drone's images. 

    These images must then be imported into your photogrammetry software - this is handled by the Flight Data Manager too in the case of Pix4Dmapper - where they can be processed to generate a high-resolution orthomosaic, digital surface model, 3D point cloud and more.

  • What kind of positional accuracy can I expect?

    The accuracy of the orthomosaics and the digital surface models (DSMs) produced by professional photogrammetry software such as Pix4Dmapper (optional with every senseFly drone) depends on various factors, including: flight height, light conditions, availability of textures, image quality, overlap, and the type of terrain being mapped.

    In standard conditions, flying at an altitude of 100-150 metres (328 - 492 ft) above natural terrain, with an image overlap of between 50% and 70%, and not using any ground control points (GCPs), a relative accuracy of 10 cm (3.9 in) and an absolute accuracy of 1 - 5 m (3.3 - 16.4 ft) can be expected at the location of the found matching points. Between these matching points the accuracy may vary. 

    These figures can be vastly improved by using GCPs, with absolute accuracy then possible of down to 0.3 cm (0.011 in) / pixel.

    Read the albris accuracy whitepaper.

    (Please note that senseFly cannot guarantee in any way the quality and accuracy of your output files.)

  • How do I determine where my drone will take photos?

    In terms of automated mapping flights, first you choose the type of eMotion X mission block you require and then define the area or building/structure in question. This program then automatically creates a flight plan based on your desired ground resolution, image overlap etc.

    The images your drone acquires will then be triggered automatically by the onboard autopilot at the correct position. 

    In the case of Interactive ScreenFly flights, you can take a photo whenever you like, or ask the drone to automatically take photos at regular intervals (by activating the Auto Trigger feature). You just set the time between the photos and albris takes care of the rest!

  • What kinds of artefacts can I expect to see?

    In general, the orthomosaics produced with photogrammetry software such as Pix4Dmapper (an option with every senseFly drone) look very smooth. However there may be some ghosting effects if the drone captured images of objects that were moving on the ground.

    There may also be distortions at specific areas of an image. These are due to inaccuracies between matching points in the digital elevation model (DEM) reconstruction. This typically happens at the edges of buildings or in areas covered by insufficient number of images.

    Pix4Dmapper includes a tool that uses linear projection to avoid distorting objects if the DEM contains inaccuracies (typically over forested areas, the edges of buildings etc.).

Commercial

Warranty & Support

Regulation

  • Do I need authorisation to fly a drone?

    Whether or not you need authorisation to fly a drone depends upon your country’s laws regarding the operation of drones.

    Today most countries either have, or are currently in the process of establishing, rules covering the operation of small drones (also called Remotely Piloted Air Systems (RPAS), Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS), and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs)).

    If in doubt, we recommend you consult your local aviation authority. Your local senseFly distributor should also be able to advise you further.

    Legal disclaimer: The content on this page is offered only as public general information. This page does not provide legal advice of any kind, and we cannot guarantee that the information is accurate, complete or up-to-date. This page should not be used as a substitute for obtaining legal advice from an attorney licensed or authorised to practice in your jurisdiction. You should always consult a suitably qualified attorney regarding any specific legal problem or matter.

  • Can senseFly be held responsible for any consequences of using a senseFly drone?

    You can compare usage of a drone to usage of a car; the driver is responsible for its actions. Therefore all use of a senseFly drone falls under the client’s sole responsibility. Under no circumstances will senseFly Ltd. be liable for any direct, indirect, special, incidental or consequential damages.

    Legal disclaimer: The content on this page is offered only as public general information. This page does not provide legal advice of any kind, and we cannot guarantee that the information is accurate, complete or up-to-date. This page should not be used as a substitute for obtaining legal advice from an attorney licensed or authorised to practice in your jurisdiction. You should always consult a suitably qualified attorney regarding any specific legal problem or matter.

  • Can senseFly drones be used in urban areas?

    In general, senseFly drones should not be operated over dense populated areas, even if technically speaking such operations are possible (meaning there is enough space for a safe take-off and landing). Some countries prohibit all flying of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) over populated areas without prior or special authorisation. Contact your local aviation authority for more information.

    Legal disclaimer: The content on this page is offered only as public general information. This page does not provide legal advice of any kind, and we cannot guarantee that the information is accurate, complete or up-to-date. This page should not be used as a substitute for obtaining legal advice from an attorney licensed or authorised to practice in your jurisdiction. You should always consult a suitably qualified attorney regarding any specific legal problem or matter.